Dublin

The town of Dublin sits on the eastern side of the East Bay Foothills, and is a growing city of over 35,000 people. But it wasn’t always like this. Originally this intersection was also the course of two major stagecoach routes; later the routes became Interstate 580/680. The first housing tract was built in 1960, transforming Dublin from a farming community to a suburb. Dublin was named after Dublin, Ireland who is now a sister city.

Dublin History as we know it goes back to the 1850’s. The Murray Schoolhouse was built in 1856, educating Dublin’s early settlers, the poor location, subject to flooding was moved to Dublin Canyon Road. Here, the schoolhouse resided for over 100 years. Eventually the community outgrew the one room schoolhouse and built new schools. With the widening of I-580, growth in the 1970’s threatened the old schoolhouse and the building was again on the move – this time to its permanent home on the Dublin Heritage Park and Museum grounds. A visit to the schoolhouse turned museum lets you follow the journey of Dublin’s settlers – three Irish teenagers who crossed the Atlantic, trail-blazed to California and built homesteads in Dublin. Western Dublin is the site of the historic Dublin Cemetery where many of Dublin’s early settlers are buried. For a walking tour map visit www.dublinonline.com/history.

The Dublin that we know today is vibrant with shopping, restaurants and events to fill your calendar. Most well know is the Saint Patrick’s Day Parade, highlighted by a weekend fair. Residents also enjoy Fallon Sports Park offering two softball field, two soccer fields, two Little League Baseball fields, four basketball courts, four tennis courts and a BMX bike facility.

Central Dublin offers homes that were part of Dublin’s original growth spurt, with larger executive homes on the slopes of the foothills. Eastern Dublin has a plethora of new and almost new construction and communities.

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